Travelling Thailand: Your Health

Many travellers and backpackers can be concerned about their health when travelling to Thailand.  Having lived here for 3 and a half years I thought I would pass on some of my knowledge. Here is an assortment of health advice, travel tips and things to be careful about in Thailand.

Mosquitos in Thailand

Generally speaking Thailand is not a malaria area and there are risks only around the borders of Thailand with other countries. Most people do not need to take malaria tablets when visiting. However, dengue fever has been on the rise in recent years so I recommend covering up in the evening and using a strong DEET repellent. Buy before you travel here as it is hard to find strong DEET. I recommend this 50% one from Amazon.

Eating Street Food in Thailand

Street food is one of Thailand’s pleasures and I have never been sick from eating street food. It is cooked hot and fresh right in front of you. There are some stalls where cooked food sits around for a hours and I would definitely avoid these places, particularly if eating meat. If you get a bad stomach in Thailand, before reaching for the Immodium, I recommend trying charcoal pills from 7/11. They are not as strong and I find work much more effectively. I think it feels more natural and is less likely to bung you up for 3 days and then you continue to have the same problem later on. This is what the packet looks like and you can usually find them near the till in any 7/11. If you contract diarrhea in Thailand you will most likely become very dehydrated so I always use electrolytes from 7/11 and I swear by coconut water too. (Also useful for hangovers from buckets…see below!)

Having Ice in your Drinks in Thailand

I never had an issue for this, until it came to drinking 50 baht mojitos in Phuket…and then I was pretty ill for a week afterwards. Lesson learnt: if the alcohol is unreasonably cheap, so is the ice! Avoid things like this in Phuket. That said, I have been sick once from ice in 3 years here so I don’t think it is something to go fretting over.

Drinking Buckets in Thailand

From Khaosan Road to the Islands you will always find a cheap bucket of alcohol to drink. While some people might recommend avoiding drinking buckets in Thailand, if you want to lesson the hangover, stick with a spirit and a mixer in the bucket rather than any of the mysterious cocktail mixes that end up with you and your sister vomiting on the journey back to Bangkok (true story.)

Drinking Tap Water in Thailand

The tap water in Thailand is not drinkable. You can buy plastic bottles from 7/11 and refill them at drinking water stations for 1 baht. You can often find these on streets and in residential areas. That said, I always use the tap water to brush my teeth in Thailand and elsewhere and have never had any problems because of this. I’m probably wrong but I feel maybe it builds up some immunity??

Travel Sick in Thailand

If you are unfortunate enough to get travel sick like me, then I cannot recommend strongly enough these travel bands. I am not even sure how they work, I think they have a bead that presses on a  pressure point that is linked with nausea, but they really work. Whether travel sick in mountain roads like from Chiang Mai to Pai or seasick on a boat, these have really helped me. It might just be psychological but who cares if they stop you from vomiting right? Buy yours here. You can also buy seasick pills from most pharmacies in Thailand very cheaply as an extra back up.
Travel Thailand Tip: Ask to sit in the front of the minivan on long journeys. I also find I tend to get less travel sick on the big buses so I try to book them instead of a minivan if possible. You can book travel tickets using this website.

Colds in Thailand

Due to various establishments that blast the AC freezing cold in Thailand, I often find myself with a cold after staying in hostels or sleeping on night buses. Normally this isn’t a problem unless you want to go scuba diving and you cannot dive with a cold because you’ll be unable to equalize properly. Enter TIFFY tablets you can buy from any pharmacy or some 7/11s. They cost around 7 baht for 4 tablets and as these are not a strong tablet it’s no problem to combine with diving.
Night bus travel tip: Bring warm clothes. They really crank up the air-con over night and if you feel the cold easily you may feel freezing like me. For a complete packing list, follow this link here.

Vaccinations for Thailand

Do you need vaccinations to travel in Thailand? Before I came here, I was recommended to get Hep A, Hep B and typhoid. Every clinic seems to recommend different things but these are the ones that I got. I decided not to bother with the expensive rabies vaccine because if you get bitten you still have to go to the hospital, it just gives you more time and I figured I was never going to be that far away from an available clinic. I usually use the NHS website for advice about vaccinations in Asia.

Animals in Thailand

Stray dogs can cause alarm in Thailand and my best advice is to just stay calm and steer clear. Most dogs here I have found extremely chilled out and not remotely interested in humans. However, you always hear a few stories. I read it is best to not look threatening, to yawn and look relaxed and calmly walk past them. If you do get bitten by a stray dog, rabies is a concern here so immediately find a clinic. Even small islands like Koh Lan or Koh Lipe have doctor’s clinics who can administer the first round of PEP injections. After that you will need 5 more injections over the course of 6 weeks.
lopburi bangkok day trip
Monkeys in one of Lopburi’s temples. Watch out for monkeys as well. Some bite!

Pharmacies in Thailand

I have found many pharmacies in Thailand to be full of helpful, English speaking staff. You can generally find what you need and for very cheap prices. You can also buy antibiotics over the counter in Thailand but this is obviously a fairly controversial thing to do so read up about it first.

Hospitals and Healthcare in Thailand

Thailand has some fantastic international hospitals…and some less fantastic hospitals. As long as you have health insurance, I would always use an expensive international hospital. The staff there speak English (or will find you a translator) and have always dealt with me efficiently and swiftly.
Disclaimer 1: I’m a teacher, not a doctor.
Disclaimer 2: This page may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase I may receive commission at no extra cost to you.

Solo Female Travel: Backpacking Alone in Thailand

Thinking about solo female travel in Thailand? I’ve been living here since 2014, I moved here alone and often travel solo around Thailand and I think it’s a fantastic place for female solo travel. I think South East Asia generally feels safe as a solo traveller and I felt much safer travelling alone in South East Asia than other countries like Sri Lanka and India.

People’s initial shock of finding out that I love travelling alone is often replaced with either a look of awe, confusion or pity. I feel that travelling alone as a female should warrant none of these reactions, but there we are. Maybe, slowly, we are changing these norms. So read on for my solo travel tips, particularly geared towards single travellers coming to Thailand and/or South East Asia.

First Solo Trip in Thailand

If it’s your first solo trip, then I can’t recommend Thailand strongly enough. I think Thailand is one of the best destinations for solo female travel, especially for first timers going it alone. Thailand welcomes millions of travellers every year and so things are well set up for travelling around that it feels very easy and convenient. I did my first solo trip to Koh Chang in Thailand 3 years ago and since then I have visited many Thailand destinations and other places in Asia solo as well, such as Indonesia, Sri Lanka and India.

Is it safe for single female travellers in Thailand?

I cannot speak for everyone but I have always felt confident enough travelling solo here. Thai people are extremely helpful, crime is not common and there are so many backpackers around that it is easy to meet people. I have had unpleasant incidents here, all of which could have happened and have happened in other countries as well. I feel the main concerns that we worry about when travelling solo are crime, scams, feeling lost or not in control and for me personally, sexual harassment, assault and rape.

Solo Female Safety: Accommodation

For me this is one of the most important factors of making sure I feel safe when travelling solo. When in a group or with a partner, I have been very relaxed about accommodation and not always booked in advance. I love the feeling of just showing up somewhere, negotiating a price, and finding a place to sleep for that night. However, when I travel alone, I always book in advance. I always choose accommodation that is in the main area/street so that I won’t be walking alone at night time. I prefer staying in hostels as it’s so easy to meet people but have also booked beach bungalows for myself before and made sure that these are along the main beach area. I book using Agoda or Booking and read reviews to see people’s comments about location and how convenient it is for other places. I always take a card from the hotel so that I can show it to people or taxis to help me get home.

 

Solo Female Backpacker: Transport – Trains

Night trains were one of my big concerns when travelling alone as you hear horror stories and I wanted night train travel in Thailand to be a good experience and not feel too worried or scared to sleep. Luckily, I always feel really safe on night trains in Thailand. Book a top bunk as I feel these are harder to access and always go second class, that way you are in a compartment with lots of other people – not just 3 people in your own cabin. I always feel there is safety in numbers. I normally chat to the people near me and get to know them and I sleep with my little backpack with my valuables near my head. I love ones about this size and think they are great for travel, you check them out on Amazon.

Read here for my 20 travelling essentials for Thailand.

Single Female Safety: Transport – Taxis

Unfortunately Thailand has a terrible record for road safety, but not much we can do about that. If you’re lucky, your taxi will have a seatbelt. If there is nothing to plug the seatbelt in to then just loop it around your body. My top tips for taking taxis in Bangkok would be to always ensure they go on the meter. It’s illegal for them not to but they will try anyway. Always sit in the back seat, never in the front. If you’re travelling alone in Bangkok then taxis can be very convenient but keep your guard up. I’ve been harassed by two taxis drivers in three years here and when I told people everyone asked me if I was sitting in the front. I wasn’t but apparently if I had I would have been asking for it. People’s attitudes suck and so do some taxi drivers but don’t let that stop you from living your life or enjoying your holiday. In Bangkok, many taxi drivers don’t always know where they are going so keep your phone out to check where they are going via GPS. Sometimes they are trying to scam you, but more often than not, I find they just don’t know the quickest route. Have your money ready so you can get out the moment the taxis pulls up. Some people feel safer using Uber but I have my doubts of whether that is really safer given recent news articles.

Travelling Thailand Solo Tip: Don’t be too polite. If you feel like a guy is being over-friendly, close down the conversation, avoid looking at him and get out of the taxi at the nearest busiest place. 7/11 convenient stores can be good as there are many of them and they are open 24 hours a day.

Solo Backpacker Safety: Transport – Night Buses

Super cheap and super cold, night buses are a very useful way of backpacking around Thailand. I frequently take them alone and have rarely encountered any problems. I keep my valuables nearby and try and get a seat downstairs. Large backpacks will often be stowed under the bus so keep all your valuables with you. I often loop an arm or a leg through my small backpack so that I might wake up if someone tried to steal it. Night buses can arrive in the early hours of the morning to random destinations so make sure you get off at your stop (the conductor can tell you) and know where you’re going if you are off the beaten track a little bit. You can book buses here for discounts. These buses are the tourist ones which depart from Khao San Road.

Solo Traveller Tips: Transport – Boats and Ferries

Generally speaking, Thailand has a good reputation for sea safety and I have rarely felt scared. That said, some ferries depart early in the morning which has left me with needing to be at a pier at 4am when it’s still dark. In these situations I try to make sure I’m staying near the pier so I can get there easily.

Travelling Solo: Walking

Walking around at night time in Thailand I have rarely felt afraid. I think there are often many people around, even late at night and I live on a main road in Bangkok. I always use a crossbody bag with a zip like this one to make it harder for someone to grab it. I feel that walking confidently can give you the appearance of knowing where you are going (even if you don’t) and can make you less of an easy target (just a personal feeling).

Single Female Traveller: Money & Documents

Thailand is a developing country and the minimum wage here is 300 baht a day. I have found Thai people to be extremely honest and I have friends who have even had expensive smart phones returned to them. However, I still think it wise to not flash around a lot of cash. I keep cash in various different places when I’m travelling and separate it into different purses or bags.

You should always carry a copy of your passport with you in Thailand. Many people don’t, but if you ever had a run in with the police then this is useful to have on you.

Safety in Thailand Information:

Emergency Police Number 191

Tourist Police (eg for scams) 1155

 

For more useful information for travelling Thailand, read this post

 

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Travelling Thailand: Useful Links

I have put together a list of useful links for travelling Thailand which cover transport, accommodation, events, tours and news.

 

Thailand Useful Links: Transport- Trains and Buses

http://www.railway.co.th/checktime/checktime.asp?lenguage=Eng Train timetable website but you cannot book tickets on it. (train ticket bookings coming soon…see kohlife below!)

Koh Life website this is actually a friend’s transport agency that he started last year and it’s going really well so far! They have tons of buses and ferry links on the decent VIP buses (think proper reclining seats and no TV blasting at you all night like some other buses I’ve been on!). They will be adding trains soon. You can get discounts for multiple bookings and group tickets.

www.thaiticketmajor.com also has bus ticket bookings for all of Thailand. I find the website is not that navigable and buses leave from different areas around Bangkok so make sure you know where the departure station is.

 

Thailand Useful Links: Transport- Flights

I usually find a great deal for domestic flights with either Air Asia or Nok Air. I always use Skyscanner to compare prices.


Thailand Useful Links: Transport- Taxis

I always just use meter taxis but I know some people are a fan of Uber and Grabtaxi. I’ve found both of these to usually be more expensive, but the benefits are taxi drivers with a GPS who will know where they are going!

Thailand Useful Links: Accommodation

I usually compare Agoda and Booking.com to find the best deal for accommodation.



Booking.com

Thailand Useful Links: Events Information

Facebook is a really useful tool for finding events happening in the area and various bars and clubs advertise special events on here.

I enjoy reading BK Magazine for inspiration about where to travel and what to do and see http://bk.asia-city.com/

Full Moon Party Schedule Information

http://fullmoonparty-thailand.com/schedules.html

Thailand Useful Links: Tours

If you’re looking for cycling tour then I definitely recommend https://www.covankessel.com/ as I have done several of their bicycle tours around Bangkok. I think they are good value for money and the guide provided has always been very knowledgeable.

For other tours I recommend using local tour agencies around Khao San area or through your hotel, Ask around to make sure you are getting the best deal.

 

Thailand Useful Links: News

For local news I follow:

www.bangkokpost.com

https://coconuts.co/bangkok/

Thailand Useful Links: Weather

None! I honestly find weather forecasts to be extremely inaccurate as the weather here is very unpredictable! The best advice I can give is to keep your options open and your travel plan flexible so you can move around if the weather turns bad.

Thailand Useful Links: What to Pack

People often ask me what they should bring out to Thailand so I wrote these two blog posts, aimed at backpackers or flashpackers.

Backpacking Essentials for South East Asia

What to Pack for South East Asia

Thailand Useful Links: Travel Books

As always the Bible for travellers is often Lonely Planet or a similar brand. I have find the Thailand one extremely useful and also Southeast Asia on Shoestring. Buy your own copy on Amazon here. I don’t recommend Kindle versions and this is one book where I would rather have a real, paper edition!

Buy Lonely Planet Thailand Travel Guide here

Buy Thailand’s Islands and Beaches version

Buy Southeast Asia on a Shoestrong by Lonely Planet here.

I always try and buy the latest version but old versions are dirt cheap and can still be useful for the planning stages of your trip.

Learn some Thai with a Thai phrasebook. I have this and it was very useful when I first arrived here. Definitely get a phrasebook with a CD or MP3 version as Thai is a tonal language and so you need to be able to hear the word to reproduce it. Buy your copy here.

 

Thailand Useful Links: This Blog!

I’ve got tons of information from itineraries to transport, from wildlife to diving and the top islands to visit. Click the links below.

Thailand Islands: The Best Islands To Visit

Best Quiet Beaches in Thailand

The Best National Parks in Thailand

Thailand: Most Beautiful Destinations

Top Activities to Do in Bangkok, Thailand by a local!

50 Things To Do in Bangkok, Thailand

Wildlife In Thailand: See Wild Animals in Thailand’s Jungles, Oceans and Islands

Pink Dolphins in Thailand: Where and How to See Wild Pink Dolphins

Best Diving in Thailand

Activities To Avoid in Thailand

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Useful Thailand linksUseful Thailand links

 

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Gift Ideas for Scuba Divers and Ocean Lovers

Looking for the perfect gift for your scuba diving or ocean obsessed loved one or friend? Read the list below for inspiration and potential gifts for Christmas presents or birthday presents for your scuba diving obsessed friend. I’ve selected presents for ocean loving people to suit a range of different online shopping budgets.

Scuba Diver Gift: Dive computer (big budget)

This is on my Christmas list this year (hint hint Mum and Dad). When you’ve got more than a few dives under your belt, you may want to start taking more responsibility for yourself underwater.  Especially if you are thinking about doing a future divemaster course then consider getting a dive computer. A friend I met on a dive boat personally recommended the Cressi Leonardo dive watch (which she actually received as a Christmas gift!). It is certainly much more budget-friendly than others I have looked at and they have a range of different colours. Compare prices and see the different ranges here on Amazon

gifts for scuba divers

Scuba Diver Gift: Books of top dive destinations

I actually bought this as a birthday present for a scuba diving friend. It has incredible photos of dive sites around the world and is definitely an inspiring present for those who love diving.

 

 

Scuba Diver Gift: Practical Present

For your scuba diving buddy who has long hair and is sick of getting hair tangled up in the mask straps behind his or her head. Buy them a scuba mask strap cover, I personally love this mermaid style one and am putting this on my Christmas present list. Click on here to compare prices and see other styles.

 

Eco-friendly Ocean Gift: Diving Themed Water Bottle

Having seen first-hand the amount of plastic floating in the water while diving in Indonesia last year I am now more of an advocate than ever for cutting down on our plastic consumption. Living in Thailand this is not always easy to do as even buying street food comes in so many different containers and in countries where you cannot drink the tap water, plastic bottled water is the only alternative. However there are now more hostels and hotels offering refills (at a discounted prices) and I always take advantage of this. For anyone who wants to save the environment, consider buying them this refillable water bottle and help save our planet, a small step at a time.

Scuba Diving Presents: GoPro and accessories (big budget presents)

While the GoPro is definitely a very generous present to receive (click here to compare prices between different GoPros) there are all sorts of extra accessories that can be bought at a cheaper amount for your already gopro obsessed friend. While I already have a selfie stick and a float, I now am after one of these domes for half water and half land shots. Although they are quite large for travelling!

 

 

 

Fun Gifts for Scuba Divers: Small Budget

I love these cute PADI inspired luggage tags for your friend or family member to add to their suitcases or even their fin or BCD bags.

Ocean Lover Present: Fish Book

Thanks to my lovely parents for this great Reef Fish ID book that I received for my birthday last year. The more I dive the more I want to be able to identify the fish I see and to develop my knowledge further. I have this one as I dive around the Indo-Pacific and it actually seems to be more in depth than most I’ve seen on dive boats themselves. Buy it or a similar one here on Amazon. 

 

perfect gifts for scuba divers and ocean lovers
Yellowface Angelfish in Komodo National Park

 

Scuba Diver Themed Gift for Men or Women: Evolution of Diving T-Shirt

I think these diving themed T-Shirts are a great extra gift to give to anyone who loves diving. I actually bought one for my first ever diving buddy a long time ago and I think it was appreciated. Check sizes and stock here and buy yours today. 

 

Ocean Gift: For the Mermaid in your life

Okay, so my awesome sister gave me one of these mermaid fishtail blankets a few years ago and it’s very cosy and perfect for snuggling up on the sofa (especially when you aren’t used to winters in the UK!). It was such a great gift and I was so happy with it! Compare mermaid blanket prices below by clicking on the image.

 

Ocean Gift: For mermaid lovers on a budget

I love this mermaid quote and who doesn’t love a good mug for their cup of tea or coffee? Ones with wittier sayings are even better. Buy yours here on Amazon.

 

Scuba Diving Gift: Practical Present

With the same mermaid quote but a notebook version, for the diver who loves to keep a journal of all their diving adventures and dive trips.

Best Practical Gift for People who love the ocean

I will forever swear by these dry bags. They are so useful and handy and I take mine everywhere with me, to the beach, islands, boat trips and even mountains when it might rain. Buy your dry bag here, I think 5 litre is the best size for a day bag.

 

 

Suggested posts for you:

For more practical ideas of what to take scuba diving, read this useful post

For useful backpacking essentials that everyone should have, click here

For an ultimate guide for what to bring travelling in South East Asia read here

 

 

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase an item I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. These are all gifts that I want or already have!

 

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Perfect Gifts for Ocean Lovers (1)Perfect Gifts for Ocean Lovers

Scuba Diving Packing List: What to Take on a Dive Boat

I started scuba diving around four years ago and completed my Open Water in Koh Tao, Thailand, like many others. So far I have dived around Asia extensively in Thailand and Indonesia but also in the Philippines, Malaysia and Taiwan so this scuba diving packing list is advice meant for diving in tropical waters. For me, scuba diving is an addiction and the more I do it, the more I want to do. A few people have asked me about what to take diving, so I thought I’d make a useful scuba packing list of what I take on a dive boat. Below are useful items that I always use for diving and pack in my dry bag. Many of these useful dive items I wish I had known about in the beginning of my diving career!

What to take on a dive boat:

1. Gopro. There are many other similar video cameras for diving but the Gopro is still a popular, small and useful item for diving. It took me too long to get mine and I missed out on some great footage of diving with turtles in the Gili islands in Indonesia.
Scuba Diving Tip: When learning to do your Open Water or Advanced qualification and doing other dive courses you are, generally speaking, not permitted to use cameras. Compare prices for GoPro HERO4 BLACK and Gopro Hero 5 on Amazon here.

take on a dive boat
Turtles and Stunning Coral in Komodo National Park

2. A red filter for the GoPro. It took me a long time until I cottoned on to this as before I received my red filter (thanks Dad!) all my photos and videos were so blue and not showing the real beauty of the coral. You lose red colour the deeper you dive. See which red filter fits your underwater camera here. 

what to take on a dive boat
How my photos looked before I bought a red filter!

3. Gopro selfie stick, a recent purchase that allows me to get closer to animals or corals without disturbing them with my bubbles or presence. Buy a similar one like this Selfie Stick GoPro Hero on Amazon.

what to take on a dive boat
Getting up close to some fish

 

4. Bikini or swimwear. I personally prefer to wear a bikini under my wetsuit as it is easier when you need to go to the toilet on the dive boat.

Scuba Diving Tip: I usually wear a bikini with straps so that I won’t flash anyone while peeling off my wetsuit but I also make sure it doesn’t have any ties near my neck that might irritate me when my wetsuit is zipped all the way up.

what to take on a dive boat
In my happy place

5. Rash vest, if you are a wimp like me and get cold even when diving in warm waters that average 29C/84F degree sea water then consider a rash vest to wear underneath your wetsuit.
Scuba Diving Tip: When diving in countries like Thailand and Malaysia, most dive centres only provide short wet suits and even might charge extra for a long wetsuit which I am not prepared to pay. Browse brand name rash vests here

Scuba Diving Tip: choose a rash vest with a zip all the way up the middle – makes it so much easier taking it on and off!

what to take on a dive boat

6. Tiger balm/ decongestant – you cannot equalise with a cold or blocked nose so these are useful for keeping your sinuses open. I have used Actifed as a very strong decongestant which always helps me equalise but you shouldn’t use it for diving consecutive days. There is also a risk of reverse block so use with caution. Buy your tiger balm and nasal sprays on Amazon or wait until you arrive in Asia as they are equally cheap here.

7. Socks! – you might not look like the coolest diver out there but if you’re wearing fins without booties for days on end then socks will stop them from rubbing (and protect my nail varnish!)

8. Dry bag – forever a fan of these. Keep your stuff dry when climbing on and off boats, from ocean spray and monsoon weather. Buy yours here for a reasonable price.

what to take on a dive boat
Dry Bag – it goes everywhere with me from dive boats to hiking National Parks

9. Spare contact lenses – if like me you need to wear contacts to actually see the fish then make sure you take a spare pair with you. I find that clearing your mask underwater particularly stings when wearing contacts and changing them between two dives can help. I use daily contacts for diving.

Scuba Diving Tip: only soft contacts can be used for diving.

10. A hoody – maybe just for people who feel the cold but multiple dives lower your body temperature so at the end of the diving day I’m often feeling the cold.

11. Suncream – I know we shouldn’t be wearing suncream to protect the reefs but I am still about protecting my skin from damage and I usually top up in between dives. I figured climate change will probably destroy the reefs more than my suncream – but maybe that’s just me being selfish.

12. GoPro extensions – something to make your gopro float that doesn’t include air. I’m still looking for a GoPro floating selfie stick so if anyone knows where I can buy one then let me know please. I used to have one of these orange devices that float but you it means you cannot see the screen on my GoPro Hero 4. Buy a floating GoPro device here.

13. Your log book – recently I’ve made sure I write in my log book in between dives – especially when doing three dives a day, to help me remember and write about the moment.

14. A sarong – I never bother with heavy beach towels nowadays and I prefer to travel with lightweight, quick drying sarongs instead. I might not always head straight home after a dive and I don’t want to be carrying around a wet, heavy towel to the bar for post diving beers. I love a turtle themed one like this one 

Read more here for the best dives sites in Thailand

Looking for more packing advice? Here are my backpacking essentials that I never travel without

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase anything from Amazon I will receive a small commission at no extra cost to you.

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scuba dive packing guide scuba dive packing guide

 

Everything you need to know about Thailand and Asia